Choc & Nut Honduras SHG

Choc & Nut Honduras SHG

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Origin: Cortes, Honduras
Varietal: Lempira, Catuai
Grade: SHG (Strictly High Grown) 
Processing: Washed
Altitude: 1400m
Certification: Fairtrade & Organic

Taste Notes: Chocolaty and Nutty, hence the name - with a slight hint of nectarine, light citrus acidity, medium to full body & a lovely lingering caramel finish.

This Honduran coffee is grown in the Villa Nueva estate the Cortés department of Honduras.

This is a fair trade and organic certified coffee, and is SHG, meaning Strictly High Grown, which is a grade given to coffees grown at over 1200 metres above sea level.

This is fully washed coffee, and the varietals are Lempira & Catuai.

Freshly Eco Roasted and packed in 100% curbside recyclable bags. 

More about Honduras Coffee.

Nobody can say for certain when coffee started being grown in Honduras, but it's thought that the first coffee beans probably arrived into Honduras from Costa Rica in the late 18th or early 19th century by travelling merchants. 

Honduras is now the biggest producer of coffee in Central America, and coffee is incredibly important to the national economy. Since the mid noughties coffee production in Honduras have grown exponentially, to the point that now in 2020 Honduras is the 5th largest producer of coffee beans in the world, with approximately 384,000 metric tons of coffee beans per year according to Wikipedia.

Where Honduras coffee has real potential to grow, is in speciality coffee. Honduras coffee up until quite recently was mainly focused towards the commodity market, with Honduras being seen mainly as an exporter of low cost, commodity coffee.

Central America became synonymous with speciality coffee throughout the 90s, but Honduras took a while to catch on with neighbouring countries, which was mainly to do with a need for infrastructure development. 

Hurricane Mitch certainly didn't help either, resulting 68% of the main roads being destroyed, and 50 bridges damaged or destroyed. Many coffee processing plants were completely washed away, large numbers of coffee farmers were left homeless, it really was a disaster which took a long time to recover from. 

The government brought in a tax on coffee exports in the late 90s, and this has gradually helped to fund the development of the coffee infrastructure in Honduras, such as new roads into more remote coffee growing areas, and financial incentives for coffee producers.  

There are now over a hundred thousand families in Honduras involved in the coffee production business, and in Honduras coffee farmers are gradually becoming younger, which is a good sign for the country's coffee industry.